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Recombinant Human Mu-type opioid receptor (OPRM1) | CSB-CF016361HU

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CSB-CF016361HU
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£1,224.80 - £1,922.40
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Description

Recombinant Human Mu-type opioid receptor (OPRM1) | CSB-CF016361HU | Cusabio

Alternative Name(s): Mu-type opioid receptor(M-OR-1)(MOR-1)(Mu opiate receptor)(Mu opioid receptor)(MOP)(hMOP)

Gene Names: OPRM1

Research Areas: Cell Biology

Organism: Homo sapiens (Human)

AA Sequence: MDSSAAPTNASNCTDALAYSSCSPAPSPGSWVNLSHLDGNLSDPCGPNRTDLGGRDSLCPPTGSPSMITAITIMALYSIVCVVGLFGNFLVMYVIVRYTKMKTATNIYIFNLALADALATSTLPFQSVNYLMGTWPFGTILCKIVISIDYYNMFTSIFTLCTMSVDRYIAVCHPVKALDFRTPRNAKIINVCNWILSSAIGLPVMFMATTKYRQGSIDCTLTFSHPTWYWENLLKICVFIFAFIMPVLIITVCYGLMILRLKSVRMLSGSKEKDRNLRRITRMVLVVVAVFIVCWTPIHIYVIIKALVTIPETTFQTVSWHFCIALGYTNSCLNPVLYAFLDENFKRCFREFCIPTSSNIEQQNSTRIRQNTRDHPSTANTVDRTNHQLENLEAETAPLP

Source: in vitro E.coli expression system

Tag Info: N-terminal 10xHis-tagged

Expression Region: 1-400aa

Sequence Info: Full Length

MW: 47.6 kDa

Purity: Greater than 85% as determined by SDS-PAGE.

Relevance: Receptor for endogenous opioids such as beta-endorphin and endomorphin. Receptor for natural and synthetic opioids including morphine, heroin, DAMGO, fentanyl, etorphine, buprenorphin and methadone (PubMed:7905839, PubMed:7957926, PubMed:7891175, PubMed:12589820, PubMed:9689128). Agonist binding to the receptor induces coupling to an inactive GDP-bound heterotrimeric G-protein complex and subsequent exchange of GDP for GTP in the G-protein alpha subunit leading to dissociation of the G-protein complex with the free GTP-bound G-protein alpha and the G-protein beta-gamma dimer activating downstream cellular effectors (PubMed:7905839). The agonist- and cell type-specific activity is predominantly coupled to pertussis toxin-sensitive G(i) and G(o) G alpha proteins, GNAI1, GNAI2, GNAI3 and GNAO1 isoforms Alpha-1 and Alpha-2, and to a lesser extent to pertussis toxin-insensitive G alpha proteins GNAZ and GNA15 (PubMed:12068084). They mediate an array of downstream cellular responses, including inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and both N-type and L-type calcium channels, activation of inward rectifying potassium channels, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phospholipase C (PLC), phosphoinositide/protein kinase (PKC), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and regulation of NF-kappa-B. Also couples to adenylate cyclase stimulatory G alpha proteins. The selective temporal coupling to G-proteins and subsequent signaling can be regulated by RGSZ proteins, such as RGS9, RGS17 and RGS4. Phosphorylation by members of the GPRK subfamily of Ser/Thr protein kinases and association with beta-arrestins is involved in short-term receptor desensitization. Beta-arrestins associate with the GPRK-phosphorylated receptor and uncouple it from the G-protein thus terminating signal transduction. The phosphorylated receptor is internalized through endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits which involves beta-arrestins. The activation of the ERK pathway occurs either in a G-protein-dependent or a beta-arrestin-dependent manner and is regulated by agonist-specific receptor phosphorylation. Acts as a class A G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) which dissociates from beta-arrestin at or near the plasma membrane and undergoes rapid recycling. Receptor down-regulation pathways are varying with the agonist and occur dependent or independent of G-protein coupling. Endogenous ligands induce rapid desensitization, endocytosis and recycling whereas morphine induces only low desensitization and endocytosis. Heterooligomerization with other GPCRs can modulate agonist binding, signaling and trafficking properties. Involved in neurogenesis. Isoform 12 couples to GNAS and is proposed to be involved in excitatory effects (PubMed:20525224). Isoform 16 and isoform 17 do not bind agonists but may act through oligomerization with binding-competent OPRM1 isoforms and reduce their ligand binding activity (PubMed:16580639).

Reference: "A novel alternatively spliced isoform of the mu-opioid receptor: functional antagonism." Gris P., Gauthier J., Cheng P., Gibson D.G., Gris D., Laur O., Pierson J., Wentworth S., Nackley A.G., Maixner W., Diatchenko L. Mol. Pain 6:33-33(2010)

Storage: The shelf life is related to many factors, storage state, buffer ingredients, storage temperature and the stability of the protein itself. Generally, the shelf life of liquid form is 6 months at -20?/-80?. The shelf life of lyophilized form is 12 months at -20?/-80?.

Notes: Repeated freezing and thawing is not recommended. Store working aliquots at 4? for up to one week.

Function:

Involvement in disease:

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Paythway:

Form: Liquid or Lyophilized powder

Buffer: If the delivery form is liquid, the default storage buffer is Tris/PBS-based buffer, 5%-50% glycerol. If the delivery form is lyophilized powder, the buffer before lyophilization is Tris/PBS-based buffer, 6% Trehalose, pH 8.0.

Reconstitution: We recommend that this vial be briefly centrifuged prior to opening to bring the contents to the bottom. Please reconstitute protein in deionized sterile water to a concentration of 0.1-1.0 mg/mL.We recommend to add 5-50% of glycerol (final concentration) and aliquot for long-term storage at -20?/-80?. Our default final concentration of glycerol is 50%. Customers could use it as reference.

Uniprot ID: P35372

HGNC Database Link: N/A

UniGene Database Link: N/A

KEGG Database Link: N/A

STRING Database Link: N/A

OMIM Database Link: N/A

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